Life Narrative

We on Bezos, trips to Lagos! – KANYE

When you’re 90 years old on your deathbed, looking back at your life, what will you have regretted not having attempted or done?

Regret minimization framework via Jeff Bezos

When you’re on your deathbed, looking back at your life, thinking and considering certain parts of your life narrative that you were proud of attempting and doing — it doesn’t really matter whether you’re successful or not, simply, do an attempt what is epic and grand!

I think in America we’re too caught up on the notion of being “successful“ or not. I think my intervention is to think rather, the grandeur and courage of the attempt. To me it doesn’t really matter whether you’re successful or not. What matters more is whether you had the courage to attempt it in the first place!

However, this is where wisdom is critical; I think it’s a good idea to attempt things when you’re interested, but at the same time, you don’t want to be foolish about it. For example, to simply attempt some thing because you want some sort of external validation seems like a poor or a foolish decision. Rather, only attempt that which is personally interesting to you!

LIFE IS A GAME OF MONOPOLY?

“Life is a game of monopoly, go out and cop yourself some property.” – MIGOS

A random thing on the road to moving to LA is this — a random thing that was coming into my mind was this idea of find some sort of property space, like buying a Triplex or a quadPlex, and essentially becoming some sort of noveau slumlord.

I had a funny interesting turbo thought when going to the Costco Business Center the other day, and buying some meat. Essentially the idea is simple:

Essentially the meat you buy and purchase is the raw material, and cooking it yourself is very simple and easy; yet, the reason why so many restaurants and businesses, even all you can eat Korean BBQ restaurants is that they make the process so complex, and intimidating to you.

Why I love cars

The primary reason why I love cars so much is that ever since I was a kid, around 15 or 16 years old, it was an open creative canvas for me. Note, I actually got into cars before I got into photography; I was into cars ever since I was 15 years old and got my first drivers license permit in California, I only going to photography later, around the age of 18 when I graduated high school and was about to go to college.

Growing up, my family only ever rented. The notion that I could modify or do anything to my house or home was a non-concept.

The great joy and promise of being able to have my own car was that I could do anything to it that I wanted. The first car I ever got was a 1991 Sentra XE, a four-door sedan, which was surprisingly a five speed manual transmission car, with no tachometer! I had so much fun modifying and customizing and swapping it up, installing headers, intake and exhaust, repainting it, painting the dashboard from the ugly ass brown to black, and also even changing the headliner from the ugly brown beige color to a solid black felt.

Mystifying things?

A funny difference that I’ve noted from my family, my family upbringing, and Cindy‘s family; Cindy grew up to owning their own home and property, therefore things like pouring cement, mixing cement, painting the walls, fixing home stuff was natural. Yet for them, cars were a mysterious black box; therefore the general concept was always buy new.

However, my great pride and joy is that in my whole adult life, I’ve never spent more than $2500 USD on a car. The last two cars which came under my wing including my mom‘s old 2009 Hyundai sonata, which was essentially acquired by me for free, as it sat dormant for about three years in my sister’s garage, collecting dust. About $2000 of repairs at the mechanic, and $1000 of overdue DMV fines, it essentially ran brand new! And a little bit of muscle wax from me, waxing the paint, painting the rims, debadging it, etc.

Then more recently, re-inheriting the family Prius; 2010 Prius. Essentially once again, acquiring it for nothing, spending $2700 to get a new catalytic converter which was stolen earlier, $300 for a catalytic converter shield, and about $2700 on a new ABS brake sensor, and also, about $600 for new Yokohama tires. Otherwise I got the car for free!

How do really rich people do it?

Some fun facts I’ve learned:

  1. Real rich people and successful people only ever purchase cars at auction; with some sort of superficial damage, and they buy it at an insanely deep discount, and spend small sums of money to fix it up, they never buy new. And it seems that a lot of successful people that I’ve met just buy old used Priuses at car auctions!
  2. People overpay for home renovations; the true price of fixing up a bathroom should only be around $7000 (some of my friends spent almost $20,000 for this), to do a kitchen, maybe $15,000, and flooring you could essentially do it yourself for free. And it seems that what a lot of these real estate companies do is simple; take some sort of old property, gut it, renovate it, which actually doesn’t cost that much money, maybe $30,000 per unit, and then resell it on the market for a higher price tag, and continue this process.

What is a millennial?

I think I have a good definition for millennials; essentially somebody who foolishly uses their money.

For example, it seems that millennials are overeager to buy new cars. Let’s say a modest new car is $30,000, and they down around $10,000. A monthly payment is around $350-$500. Then they forget that they bought a new car, and they probably want full coverage, so insurance wise, it might be another three to $500 a month! Boom, you’ve just added another thousand dollars a month in monthly expenses, which will haunt you for either 3 to 5 years. That’s money that you’re not putting in your bank account.

Alcohol, food, eating out, weed, drugs, etc

“Fuck I’m broke as fuck! Why? I just came back from Vegas and blew all my money on food! Fuck, I gotta move out of SoCal!” – one of my friends in the gym hot sauna locker room

Another way that young people millennials etc. waste money is silly things like going to “festivals“, doing drugs, smoking marijuana, drinking alcohol, going out to drink alcohol and cocktails, going to Vegas, gambling, eating out at new trendy restaurants, etc.

Also, having too much subscriptions to these media services like Netflix, Hulu, Disney+ etc.

The overall bad thing is that many people just cannot save money. Why? The societal bias that one should partake in these activities. But, the wisdom is knowing that these things are not imperatives.

Finance, and loans?

Poking around this real estate and financing market, honestly it all seems like such a scam. For example, let us say that you take out a loan at 7% or 6.5%. But I say you borrow around $700,000. Almost the first 10 yours is devoted to paying off your interest, not even the principal.

What did Elon musk do? When starting tesla, he took out a massive loan from the US government, to build a pack trees, battery packs, etc.

Therefore, it seems that if one is going to take out a massive loan, the goal is to quickly pay it back. Tears alone, borrowing money as leverage to do something very very great in epic, and quickly leapfrog to the next thing.

Blank Slate Genius

To be naïve is a virtue in so far much as you have a blank slate, a blank mental canvas to innovate!

Entrepreneurship by KIM

Become the change which you desire to see manifested in the world!

Become you.

  1. ZERO FINANCIAL CONCERNS
  2. How to Gain Ascendancy
  3. Business vs Entrepreneurship?
  4. TAKE REAL CHANCES
  5. Making Money as a Hobby
  6. The Best Exercises for Entrepreneurs
  7. INCOME VS EXPENSES MONEY LIFESTYLE PHILOSOPHY
  8. Entrepreneurship is the privilege of being able to attempt something new
  9. How to Become More Influential
  10. The Point of Life is Entrepreneurship?
  11. How to Think Like an Entrepreneur
  12. Become the Outlier
  13. Self Reliance
  14. How to Extend Your Reach
  15. NEWS: How to Think Like an Entrepreneur
  16. PVP (Player vs Player)
  17. How I became so influential
  18. WE LOVE THE *SENSATION* OF RISK-TAKING
  19. WHY HIGH PROFIT MARGINS?
  20. INNOVATION THOUGHTS
  21. OVERCONFIDENCE IS GOOD.
  22. GARAGE ENTREPRENEURSHIP
  23. PERHAPS IT IS GOOD TO BE “DELUSIONAL”
  24. USE YOUR WEALTH TO BUY STUFF, OR TO BUILD AND INNOVATE STUFF?
  25. HOW TO THRIVE
  26. Target Demographic
  27. Ambition Over Happiness
  28. Anti Collaboration
  29. The Will to Economy
  30. Why New?
  31. CHOOSE ADRENALINE.
  32. No Looking Back.
  33. 1000x Different
  34. BECOME SPENDTHRIFT
  35. THE BENEFIT OF JUST ONE.
  36. EXTREME INNOVATION.
  37. Practicality is Boring
  38. BECOME YOUR OWN STANDARD.
  39. NEVER STOP ITERATING.
  40. CONDENSE.
  41. Take Lots of Small Financial Risks
  42. Control Over Convenience
  43. Why Are Chinese Companies So Innovative?
  44. INSANELY DIFFERENT.
  45. Why Doesn’t Anything Ever Satisfy Me?
  46. THE GREAT PASSION.
  47. Perhaps Dissatisfaction is Good
  48. ONE REP MAX.
  49. WHAT DO YOU *REALLY* WANT IN LIFE?
  50. LIFE IS ABOUT STRIVING FOR MORE.
  51. NEVER STOP LINKING.
  52. THE GREATEST.
  53. WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE!
  54. THE BEST IS YET TO COME.
  55. ERIC KIM CRITIQUE OF ROMANTICISM
  56. COMPLACENCY.
  57. JUST BUY IT.
  58. ALL ABOUT YOU.
  59. MOVE THE WORLD
  60. Boring or Not Boring?
  61. What if Your Past Self were Inferior to Your Present Self?
  62. THE PHILOSOPHY OF PROGRESS
  63. CULTURE IS YOUR ENEMY.
  64. Difficulty & Interest
  65. The Will to Expansion
  66. What is Work?
  67. SOUL IN THE GAME.
  68. JUST START IT.
  69. Not Boring
  70. PRIDE IN YOUR OWN NAME / BRAND
  71. AS MUCH AS YOU CAN TOLERATE.
  72. Speed is Paramount
  73. TAKE IT BACK TO THE BEGINNING.
  74. A Life With No Risk Taking is *NOT* a Life Worth Living
  75. Dissatisfaction is Good
  76. GREATER STRENGTH, GREATER CHALLENGES.
  77. In Praise of the New
  78. Uncorrupted Desires
  79. You Cannot Fake Passion
  80. SELF-OVERGOING
  81. FORM YOURSELF.
  82. Personal Entrepreneurship
  83. RELENTLESS.
  84. PUT YOUR NAME ON IT.
  85. A Life of Expansion
  86. SELF-ENTREPRENEURSHIP
  87. YOU ARE THE EXCEPTION.
  88. Use Your Life as an Experiment to Self-Develop Yourself to Heights Never Seen Before
  89. Invest in New Developments
  90. Investing Towards What End?
  91. The 90%/10% Principle in Entrepreneurship
  92. Speed Wins
  93. The Philosophy of Happiness
  94. When to Over-Estimate, When to Under-Estimate?
  95. Never Stop Iterating
  96. Money as a Tool for Life and Artistic Experimentation
  97. Less But More Premium
  98. Mainstream vs Low-Key Success
  99. Why Dissatisfaction is Good
  100. SEEK YOUR OWN PERSONAL MAXIMAL BENEFIT INSTEAD OF COMPLAINING
  101. Manifest Your Destiny
  102. Is it Best to *Not* Communicate Your Inner Thoughts or Ideas With Others?
  103. CREATE THINGS YOU WISH TO SEE MANIFESTED IN THE WORLD
  104. How to Do More Work
  105. CONTROL.
  106. Competition is for Losers
  107. Change.
  108. Your Competitive Advantage with Insanely Fast Wifi and High Speed Internet
  109. Pseudo Individualism
  110. Natural Internal Promoting vs External Promptings

Think for Yourself.

  1. Survival vs Thrivival
  2. Become Rich
  3. SECRETS.
  4. Why it is Better to Beg for Forgiveness than Ask for Permission
  5. Thinking About the Past Prevents You From Thinking About the Future
  6. How to Predict the Future
  7. Tools of Mass Distraction
  8. So What?

FREEDOM


Never stop innovating.


Entrepreneurship Mindset


Put a Dent in the Universe.

REAL RISK

The path to the greatest life is the life with Maximum risk:

The path to real success:

LIFE IS A GAME OF MONOPOLY?

“Life is a game of monopoly, go out and cop yourself some property.” – MIGOS

A random thing on the road to moving to LA is this — a random thing that was coming into my mind was this idea of find some sort of property space, like buying a Triplex or a quadPlex, and essentially becoming some sort of noveau slumlord.

I had a funny interesting turbo thought when going to the Costco Business Center the other day, and buying some meat. Essentially the idea is simple:

Essentially the meat you buy and purchase is the raw material, and cooking it yourself is very simple and easy; yet, the reason why so many restaurants and businesses, even all you can eat Korean BBQ restaurants is that they make the process so complex, and intimidating to you.

Why I love cars

The primary reason why I love cars so much is that ever since I was a kid, around 15 or 16 years old, it was an open creative canvas for me. Note, I actually got into cars before I got into photography; I was into cars ever since I was 15 years old and got my first drivers license permit in California, I only going to photography later, around the age of 18 when I graduated high school and was about to go to college.

Growing up, my family only ever rented. The notion that I could modify or do anything to my house or home was a non-concept.

The great joy and promise of being able to have my own car was that I could do anything to it that I wanted. The first car I ever got was a 1991 Sentra XE, a four-door sedan, which was surprisingly a five speed manual transmission car, with no tachometer! I had so much fun modifying and customizing and swapping it up, installing headers, intake and exhaust, repainting it, painting the dashboard from the ugly ass brown to black, and also even changing the headliner from the ugly brown beige color to a solid black felt.

Mystifying things?

A funny difference that I’ve noted from my family, my family upbringing, and Cindy‘s family; Cindy grew up to owning their own home and property, therefore things like pouring cement, mixing cement, painting the walls, fixing home stuff was natural. Yet for them, cars were a mysterious black box; therefore the general concept was always buy new.

However, my great pride and joy is that in my whole adult life, I’ve never spent more than $2500 USD on a car. The last two cars which came under my wing including my mom‘s old 2009 Hyundai sonata, which was essentially acquired by me for free, as it sat dormant for about three years in my sister’s garage, collecting dust. About $2000 of repairs at the mechanic, and $1000 of overdue DMV fines, it essentially ran brand new! And a little bit of muscle wax from me, waxing the paint, painting the rims, debadging it, etc.

Then more recently, re-inheriting the family Prius; 2010 Prius. Essentially once again, acquiring it for nothing, spending $2700 to get a new catalytic converter which was stolen earlier, $300 for a catalytic converter shield, and about $2700 on a new ABS brake sensor, and also, about $600 for new Yokohama tires. Otherwise I got the car for free!

How do really rich people do it?

Some fun facts I’ve learned:

  1. Real rich people and successful people only ever purchase cars at auction; with some sort of superficial damage, and they buy it at an insanely deep discount, and spend small sums of money to fix it up, they never buy new. And it seems that a lot of successful people that I’ve met just buy old used Priuses at car auctions!
  2. People overpay for home renovations; the true price of fixing up a bathroom should only be around $7000 (some of my friends spent almost $20,000 for this), to do a kitchen, maybe $15,000, and flooring you could essentially do it yourself for free. And it seems that what a lot of these real estate companies do is simple; take some sort of old property, gut it, renovate it, which actually doesn’t cost that much money, maybe $30,000 per unit, and then resell it on the market for a higher price tag, and continue this process.

What is a millennial?

I think I have a good definition for millennials; essentially somebody who foolishly uses their money.

For example, it seems that millennials are overeager to buy new cars. Let’s say a modest new car is $30,000, and they down around $10,000. A monthly payment is around $350-$500. Then they forget that they bought a new car, and they probably want full coverage, so insurance wise, it might be another three to $500 a month! Boom, you’ve just added another thousand dollars a month in monthly expenses, which will haunt you for either 3 to 5 years. That’s money that you’re not putting in your bank account.

Alcohol, food, eating out, weed, drugs, etc

“Fuck I’m broke as fuck! Why? I just came back from Vegas and blew all my money on food! Fuck, I gotta move out of SoCal!” – one of my friends in the gym hot sauna locker room

Another way that young people millennials etc. waste money is silly things like going to “festivals“, doing drugs, smoking marijuana, drinking alcohol, going out to drink alcohol and cocktails, going to Vegas, gambling, eating out at new trendy restaurants, etc.

Also, having too much subscriptions to these media services like Netflix, Hulu, Disney+ etc.

The overall bad thing is that many people just cannot save money. Why? The societal bias that one should partake in these activities. But, the wisdom is knowing that these things are not imperatives.

Day Start

  1. Open the blinds let the fresh air come in, open the windows
  2. Cold shower
  3. Tons of ERIC KIM COFFEE
  4. Hit the gym, empty your bowels there, hit the hot sauna, workout one rep max, head out! Think of the gym like your morning commute & office? Co working space with hot sauna and weights!